Food Safety: Cookware & Equipment
  • How do I prevent cross-contamination (the transfer of harmful bacteria to food from other foods) when using a cutting board?
  • Should I use a wooden cutting board or a plastic one?
  • How do I clean my cutting board?
  • How reliable are pop-up timers in poultry as an indication of safe internal temperatures?
  • What types of kitchen thermometers are available, and how should each be used?
  • Is it safe to cook in a slow cooker, since it cooks at such a low temperature?

How do I prevent cross-contamination (the transfer of harmful bacteria to food from other foods) when using a cutting board?
Regardless of the type of cutting board you prefer, wood or a nonporous surface, consider using one for fresh produce and a separate one for raw meat, poultry, and seafood. This will prevent bacteria on a cutting board that is used for raw meat, poultry, or seafood from cross-contaminating a food that requires no further cooking.

  • Always use a clean cutting board. Wash cutting boards with hot, soapy water after preparing each food item.
  • After washing, you may choose to sanitize the cutting boards with a solution of 1 tablespoon of unscented, liquid chlorine bleach per gallon of water. Flood surface with the bleach solution and allow it to stand for several minutes. Rinse with clear water and air or pat dry with clean paper towels.
  • Another good and easy way to wash the cutting board is to run it through the dishwasher after use. Non-porous acrylic, plastic, glass, and solid wood boards can be washed in a dishwasher (laminated boards may crack and split).
  • If possible, use one cutting board for fresh produce and a separate one for raw meat, poultry, and seafood.
  • Once cutting boards become excessively worn or develop hard-to-clean grooves, you should replace them. Even plastic boards wear out over time.


Should I use a wooden cutting board or a plastic one?
You can choose either wood or a nonporous surface cutting board. Research shows that nonporous surfaces, such as plastic, marble, tempered glass, and pyroceramic are easier to clean than wood. Wood surfaces are considered porous. Once cutting boards become excessively worn or develop hard-to-clean grooves, you should replace them. Even plastic boards wear out over time.

How do I clean my cutting board?
Cutting boards need to be maintained and monitored for cleanliness.

  • They should be washed with hot, soapy water after preparing each food item.
  • After washing, you may choose to sanitize the cutting boards with a solution of 1 tablespoon of unscented, liquid chlorine bleach per gallon of water. Flood surface with the bleach solution and allow it to stand for several minutes. Rinse with clear water and air or pat dry with clean paper towels.
  • Another good and easy way to wash the cutting boards is to run it through the dishwasher after use. Non-porous acrylic, plastic, glass, and solid wood boards can be washed in a dishwasher (laminated boards may crack and split).
  • Even plastic boards wear out over time. Once cutting boards become excessively worn or develop hard-to-clean grooves, replace them.


How reliable are pop-up timers in poultry as an indication of safe internal temperatures?
Commonly used in turkeys and roasting chickens since 1965, the "pop-up" temperature device is constructed from a food-approved nylon. The inside contains a stainless steel spring and firing material. The firing material is made of an organic salt compound or an alloy of metals commonly used in other thermo-sensing devices. The tip of the stem is imbedded in the firing material until it melts, releasing the stem, which is then "popped up" by means of the spring. This indicates that the food has reached the final temperature for safety and doneness. Pop-up timers are reliable within 1 to 2 °F if accurately placed in a food; however, checking the temperature of other parts of the food with a conventional food thermometer is recommended. (Source: Kitchen Thermometers: Technical Information from FSIS)

What types of kitchen thermometers are available, and how should each be used?
Lots of information on food thermometer use is available on the Thermy™ Web site: www.fsis.usda.gov/thermy. For information (including illustrations) on various types of thermometers and their use, see Thermy's™ Kitchen Thermometers page.

Is it safe to cook in a slow cooker, since it cooks at such a low temperature?
Yes, the slow cooker, a countertop appliance, cooks foods slowly at a low temperature -- generally between 77° and 138 °C. The low heat helps less expensive, leaner cuts of meat become tender and shrink less.

The direct heat from the pot, lengthy cooking and steam created within the tightly-covered container combine to destroy bacteria and make the slow cooker a safe process for cooking foods.

CONTACT US
House No: #1-39-117/1, Plot No.61,
PR Nagar, West Venkatapuram,
Alwal, Secunderabad-15. A.P. INDIA.
Cell: 9908556877
HOME   |  ABOUT US  |  SERVICES   |   HISTORY  |   CURRENT PROJECTS   |  FAQ   |  CONTACT US
© 2011 | APFOODSAFETY | All Rights Reserved